Tea and the tea-table in eighteenth-century England
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Tea and the tea-table in eighteenth-century England

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Published by Pickering & Chatto in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Tea,
  • Sources,
  • Tea trade,
  • Tea in literature,
  • History

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementgeneral editor, Markman Ellis
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGT2907.G7 T43 2010
The Physical Object
Pagination4 v. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24868725M
ISBN 101848930259
ISBN 109781848930254
LC Control Number2011453224
OCLC/WorldCa502097463

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  This four-volume, reset collection takes as its starting point the earliest substantial descriptions of tea as a commodity in the mid-seventeenth century, and ends in the early nineteenth century with two key events: the discovery of tea plants in Assam in , and the dissolution of the East India Company's monopoly on the tea trade in Author: Ben Dew. This four-volume collection takes as its starting point the earliest substantial descriptions of tea as a commodity in the midth century, and ends in the early 19th century with two key events: the discovery of tea plants in Assam in , and the dissolution of the East India Company's monopoly on the tea trade in   This four-volume, reset collection takes as its starting point the earliest substantial descriptions of tea as a commodity in the mid-seventeenth century, and ends in the early nineteenth century with two key events: the discovery of tea plants in Assam in , and the dissolution of the East India Company’s monopoly on the tea trade in Author: Ben Dew. Tea and the tea-table in eighteenth-century england Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.

Books produced for the project include the edition Tea and the Tea-Table in Eighteenth-Century England by Markman Ellis, Richard Coulton, Matthew Mauger and Ben Dew (). The project is completing a collaborative monograph entitled The Empire of Tea for Reaktion in Up to Research Interests.   That tea drinking was a status symbol also is indicated by the fact that the artist has used the tea ceremony as the theme of the picture and the tea table as the focal point. Eighteenth-century pictures and writings are basic source materials for information about Anglo-American tea drinking. Since the eighteenth century, the United Kingdom has been one of the world's largest tea consumers, with an average annual per capita tea supply of kg ( lbs). The British Empire was instrumental in spreading tea from China to India; British interests controlled tea production in the subcontinent. Tea, which was an upper-class drink in continental Europe, became the infusion of every. I am the general editor of the History of Tea Project at Queen Mary, which produced a four-volume edition of texts on tea and its cultures entitled Tea and the Tea-Table in Eighteenth-Century.

English coffeehouses in the 17th and 18th centuries were public social places where men would meet for conversation and commerce. For the price of a penny, customers purchased a cup of coffee and admission. Travellers introduced coffee as a beverage to England during the midth century; previously it had been consumed mainly for its supposed medicinal properties. The book is organized around three aspects of consumption. 'The Tea Table' illustrates the disciplining of the female body and its potential for unruliness. 'Shopping' concerns a female consumer who is both compliant and insatiably desirous. During the 18th century, affluent American colonists continued the British custom of having a sumptuous tea in the afternoon. Thus, the use of tea tables became a popular means of presentation for this repast. Because tea, tea tables, and a fancy tea service were expensive, it was a . 'Restoration' England and the History of Sociability - Brian Cowan Mapping Sociability on Restoration Townscapes - Marie-Madeleine Martinet Club Sociability and the Emergence of New 'Sociable' Practices - Valérie Capdeville The Tea-table, Women, and Gossip in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain - .